• Recent Bard economics alums (Juan Bages, Stergios Mentesidis, Ahnaf Khan and Nicolai Eddy) sharing their experiences with current students at a career advising panel organized by alumni and the Career Development Office at Morningstar, World Trade Center, NYC  Sept 2017
  • Simon Simoski '17 presenting his research on household-debt driven growth.  In the fall, he will join the Masters program at the Levy Institute at Bard.
  • Professors Mike Martell, Ani Mitra and Sanjay DeSilva at the annual picnic - May 2017
  • Prof. Pavlina Tcherneva with students at the annual program picnic - May 2017
  • Prof. Olivier Giovannoni, Nathan Reece and Arielle Weiner-Bronner discussing their research poster at the Bard Summer Research Institute 2014.
  • Eva-Marie Quinones '17 (joint economics and global and international studies major) presenting her research on economic factors that enabled the spread of far-right political parties in Western Europe. She will proceed to the Ph.D. program in political science at Yale this fall.
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Program Events

 

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Archive of Past Events

                                        

2013

Monday, December 9, 2013

Outswimming the Sharks: Local activism in a national movement to stop predatory home lending

What do activists do when facing a supposedly unstoppable force? In the context of the housing boom of the last decade, efforts to limit abuses in the so-called sub prime home lending market were complicated by rising home ownership and rapidly growing industry profits. In this talk I examine how advocacy and nonprofit organizations mobilized to confront a problem with local consequences but extra-local causes.

I focus on the development of city and state anti-predatory lending laws intended to limit abuses, and the subsequent push-back against these efforts. Using legal cases, interviews, and documents by advocates, industry representatives, and policy-makers, I argue that debates between supporters and opponents were as much about scale as they were about the particular laws themselves. In other words, the question was whether cities and states should even have the power to regulate lending. Finally, I argue that the legal outcomes of these debates reshaped the home lending market, with consequences for the larger economy.
Reem-Kayden Center Laszlo Z. Bito '60 Auditorium 

Monday, December 2, 2013

Slow Loris Conservation in Vietnam: Multidisciplinary Approaches to Address a Complex Conservation Problem

Mary Blair, American Museum of Natural History

Mary Blair, Ph.D., is Assistant Director for Research and Strategic Planning at the American Museum of Natural History’s Center for Biodiversity and Conservation (CBC) and an NSF Science, Engineering, and Education for Sustainability (SEES) Fellow.

The Center for Biodiversity and Conservation (CBC) has engaged in scientific research to inform conservation in Vietnam since 1997, resulting in over 42 new species described. Most recently, CBC began a project to inform and improve the conservation management of slow lorises, which are small, nocturnal primates. The greatest threat to the survival of slow lorises is the illegal wildlife trade; they are in high demand across their range for traditional medicines, as pets, and for food. By studying populations found in protected areas across Vietnam and nearby wildlife markets, CBC scientists have been gathering the basic biological data that are necessary for conservation managers to more effectively protect these species. CBC is now embarking on a new dimension of this project in collaboration with Dr. Gautam Sethi at Bard, to integrate biological approaches with econometrics to better understand the nature of the wildlife trade in Vietnam and its impacts on slow loris populations. Multidisciplinary approaches such as these are increasingly necessary and appropriate to solve today’s complex conservation challenges.

More on Mary Blair

Reem-Kayden Center Laszlo Z. Bito '60 Auditorium 

Thursday, September 26, 2013

NYU Study Abroad Tabling in Campus Center

A rep from NYU'study abroad is on campus today with information about their programs worldwide. Drop by to see if one of their programs might be for you!

Thinking about Study Abroad but don't know how it works at Bard?
It's never too early to start planning where/when/how. Contact Study Abroad Adviser Trish Fleming at 845-758-7080 or fleming@bard.edu to make an appointment. 

Campus Center, Lobby 

Monday, September 16, 2013

Bard-Levy Master of Science in Economic Theory and Policy Open House

The Levy Institute of Economics is starting it's Master of Science in Economic Theory and Policy program from the Fall of 2014. The program emphasizes theoretical and empirical aspects of policy analysis through specialization in one of four Levy Institute research areas: macroeconomic theory, policy, and modeling; monetary policy and financial structure; distribution of income, wealth, and well-being, including gender equality and time poverty; and employment and labor markets.

The Master of Science program draws on the expertise of an extensive network of scholars at the Levy Economics Institute, a policy research think tank with more than 25 years of economic theory and public policy research. During the two-year M.S. program, students are required to participate in a graduate research assistantship carried out by Levy Institute scholars and faculty. Undergraduates in economics or related fields have an opportunity, through a 3+2 program, to earn both a B.A. and the M.S. in five years. Reem-Kayden Center Laszlo Z. Bito '60 Auditorium 

Friday, August 23, 2013

Can Gross National Happiness Guide the Global Economy

Join us for an evening lecture with sustainability expert and Bard MBA Faculty, Hunter Lovins. Lovins will discuss her work with the government of Bhutan and the UN to develop a new roadmap for global economic sustainability. Please join her for a progress report. All are welcome to attend. 


Hunter Lovins, Bard MBA Faculty; President of Natural Capitalism, Inc.
Hunter Lovins J.D., Loyola Law School; B.S. (Sociology, Political Science). L. Hunter Lovins is president and founder of Natural Capitalism Solutions (NCS). NCS educates senior decision makers in business, government, and civil society to restore and enhance natural and human capital while increasing prosperity and quality of life. Lovins is also currently a faculty member at Bainbridge Graduate Institute and the chief insurgent of the Madrone Project. Lovins has consulted for scores of industries, governments, and large and small companies worldwide. Recipient of such honors as the Right Livelihood Award, Lindbergh Award, and Leadership in Business, she was named Time Magazine 2000 Hero of the Planet and in 2009 Newsweek dubbed her a “Green Business Icon.” She has co-authored nine books and hundreds of papers, including the 1999 book Natural Capitalism, 2006 e-book Climate Protection Manual for Cities, and the 2009 book Transforming Industry in Asia. She has served on the boards of governments, nonprofit organizations, and for-profit companies. Lovins’s areas of expertise include natural capitalism, sustainable development, globalization, energy and resource policy, economic development, climate change, land management, fire rescue, and emergency medicine. She developed the Economic Renewal Project and helped write many of its manuals on sustainable community economic development. She was a founding professor of business at Presidio Graduate School, one of the first accredited programs offering an M.B.A. in sustainable management.

Olin Language Center, Room 115 

Thursday, May 23, 2013

Economics Tutoring Room

Tutors on hand to help with Econ100 (Principles of Economics), Econ 102 (Intermediate Macroeconomics), Econ/Fin 291 (Finance/Investments), and Econ 229 (Statistics). Hegeman 308 

Tuesday, May 21, 2013

Economics Tutoring Room

Tutors on hand to help with Econ100 (Principles of Economics), Econ 102 (Intermediate Macroeconomics), Econ/Fin 291 (Finance/Investments), and Econ 229 (Statistics). Hegeman 308 

Thursday, May 16, 2013

Economics Tutoring Room

Tutors on hand to help with Econ100 (Principles of Economics), Econ 102 (Intermediate Macroeconomics), Econ/Fin 291 (Finance/Investments), and Econ 229 (Statistics). Hegeman 308 

Tuesday, May 14, 2013

Economics Tutoring Room

Tutors on hand to help with Econ100 (Principles of Economics), Econ 102 (Intermediate Macroeconomics), Econ/Fin 291 (Finance/Investments), and Econ 229 (Statistics). Hegeman 308 

Thursday, May 9, 2013

Economics Tutoring Room

Tutors on hand to help with Econ100 (Principles of Economics), Econ 102 (Intermediate Macroeconomics), Econ/Fin 291 (Finance/Investments), and Econ 229 (Statistics). Hegeman 308 

Tuesday, May 7, 2013

Economics Tutoring Room

Tutors on hand to help with Econ100 (Principles of Economics), Econ 102 (Intermediate Macroeconomics), Econ/Fin 291 (Finance/Investments), and Econ 229 (Statistics). Hegeman 308 

Tuesday, May 7, 2013

What Economists Can Learn from Human Rights Law

Philip Harvey
Rutgers School of Law


Philip L. Harvey is professor of law and economics at Rutgers University School of Law. He received his B.A. degree from Yale University, his Ph.D. in economics from the New School for Social Research, and his J.D. from Yale Law School. After clerking for the Honorable Robert L. Carter in the Southern District of New York, he worked as a Litigation Associate specializing in employment disputes at the New York law firm of Debevoise and Plimpton. He also has been a Visiting Scholar at the Russell Sage Foundation, a Visiting Professor of Law and Economics at the Yale School of Organization and Management, and was the first Joanne Woodward Professor of Public Policy at Sarah Lawrence College. Professor Harvey's research focuses on public policy options for securing economic and social human rights, with a particular emphasis on the right to work. He teaches Contracts, Labor and Employment Law, Law & Economics, and Social Welfare Law and Policy.

*pizza will be served

This talk is part of the ongoing Economics seminar series, which is dedicated to furthering the exchange of economic ideas in the greater Bard community.

Hegeman 102 

Thursday, May 2, 2013

Economics Tutoring Room

Tutors on hand to help with Econ100 (Principles of Economics), Econ 102 (Intermediate Macroeconomics), Econ/Fin 291 (Finance/Investments), and Econ 229 (Statistics). Hegeman 308 

Tuesday, April 30, 2013

Economics Tutoring Room

Tutors on hand to help with Econ100 (Principles of Economics), Econ 102 (Intermediate Macroeconomics), Econ/Fin 291 (Finance/Investments), and Econ 229 (Statistics). Hegeman 308 

Thursday, April 25, 2013

Economics Tutoring Room

Tutors on hand to help with Econ100 (Principles of Economics), Econ 102 (Intermediate Macroeconomics), Econ/Fin 291 (Finance/Investments), and Econ 229 (Statistics). Hegeman 308 

Tuesday, April 23, 2013

Economics Tutoring Room

Tutors on hand to help with Econ100 (Principles of Economics), Econ 102 (Intermediate Macroeconomics), Econ/Fin 291 (Finance/Investments), and Econ 229 (Statistics). Hegeman 308 

Thursday, April 18, 2013

Economics Tutoring Room

Tutors on hand to help with Econ100 (Principles of Economics), Econ 102 (Intermediate Macroeconomics), Econ/Fin 291 (Finance/Investments), and Econ 229 (Statistics). Hegeman 308 

Tuesday, April 16, 2013

Protest Movements in Russia, 2011-2012: Who, Why, and What's the Result

A talk by Artemy Magun
Professor Artemy Magun, Head of International Relations, Political Science, and the Human Rights Program at Smolny Colege and a Professor of Political Science and Sociology at the European University at Saint Petersburg, discusses the role of populism in contemporary Russian protest movements
Olin, Room 204 

Tuesday, April 16, 2013

Economics Tutoring Room

Tutors on hand to help with Econ100 (Principles of Economics), Econ 102 (Intermediate Macroeconomics), Econ/Fin 291 (Finance/Investments), and Econ 229 (Statistics). Hegeman 308 

Thursday, April 11, 2013

Economics Tutoring Room

Tutors on hand to help with Econ100 (Principles of Economics), Econ 102 (Intermediate Macroeconomics), Econ/Fin 291 (Finance/Investments), and Econ 229 (Statistics). Hegeman 308 

Thursday, April 11, 2013

Economics Seminar Series

A very distinguished speaker
Nicos Christodoulakis
Professor of Economic Analysis at the Athens University of Economics and Business (AUEB) and a Research Associate at LSE, Hellenic Observatory

will give a talk on Greece and economic policies
entitled
From “Grexit” to Growth: on fiscal multipliers and how to end recession in Greece

From 1996 to 2004 Nicos Christodoulakis was successively the Deputy Minister of Finance, the Minister for Industry and Energy and the Minister for the Economy and Finance in Greece. Nicos participated to meetings at the World Bank, at the IMF and of the G7. In 2002-2003 he was chair of the Euro Group and Econ Fin, which are composed of all finance ministers of the Eurozone / member States of the European Union. From 1999 to 2007 he was elected as a member of the Greek Parliament with the PASOK party.

During his long and distinguished academic career and public service, Nicos has published several books and articles on economic policy and economic crises. His most recent books include: “Can the Titanic be saved? From Memorandum, back to Growth” (2011) and “Economic Theories and Crises: The cycle of Rationality and Folly” (2012).
Campus Center, Weis Cinema 

Tuesday, April 9, 2013

Economics Tutoring Room

Tutors on hand to help with Econ100 (Principles of Economics), Econ 102 (Intermediate Macroeconomics), Econ/Fin 291 (Finance/Investments), and Econ 229 (Statistics). Hegeman 308 

Thursday, April 4, 2013

Economics Tutoring Room

Tutors on hand to help with Econ100 (Principles of Economics), Econ 102 (Intermediate Macroeconomics), Econ/Fin 291 (Finance/Investments), and Econ 229 (Statistics). Hegeman 308 

Tuesday, April 2, 2013

Economics Tutoring Room

Tutors on hand to help with Econ100 (Principles of Economics), Econ 102 (Intermediate Macroeconomics), Econ/Fin 291 (Finance/Investments), and Econ 229 (Statistics). Hegeman 308 

Monday, March 4, 2013

Doing Capitalism in the Innovation Economy

William H. Janeway
Instutute for New Economic Thinking and Warburg Pincus Technology

EXCERPT FROM THE BOOK Doing Capitalism

“The Innovation Economy begins with discovery and culminates in speculation. Over some 250 years, economic growth has been driven by successive processes of trial and error and error and error: upstream exercises in research and invention, and downstream experiments in exploiting the new economic space opened by innovation. Each of these activities necessarily generates much waste along the way: dead-end research programs, useless inventions and failed commercial ventures. In between, the innovations that have repeatedly transformed the architecture of the market economy, from canals to the internet, have required massive investments to construct networks whose value in use could not be imagined at the outset of deployment. And so at each stage the Innovation Economy depends on sources of funding that are decoupled from concern for economic return.”

 ABOUT THE AUTHOR

William H. Janeway has lived a double life of “theorist-practitioner,” according to the legendary economist Hyman Minsky who first applied that term to him twenty-five years ago. In his role as “practitioner,” Bill Janeway has been an active venture capital investor for more than 40 years, during which time he built and led the Warburg Pincus Technology Investment team that provided financial backing to a series of companies making critical contributions to the internet economy. As a “theorist,” Janeway received a Ph.D in Economics from Cambridge University where he was a Marshall Scholar.  His doctoral study on the formulation of economic policy following the Great Crash of 1929 was supervised by Keynes’ leading student, Richard Kahn (author of the foundational paper on “the multiplier.”)  Janeway went on to found the Cambridge Endowment for Research in Finance.  Currently he serves as a Teaching Visitor at the Princeton University Economics Department and Visiting Scholar in the Economics Faculty of Cambridge University. He is a member of the Management Board of Cambridge Endowment for Research in Finance (CERF) and a co-founder and member of the Governing Board of the Institute for New Economic Thinking (INET).  He serves on the Advisory Boards of the Princeton Bendheim Center for Finance and the MIT-Sloan Finance Group. In September 2012, Janeway received the honorary award of Commander of the Order of the British Empire (CBE) for services to education in support of Cambridge University and to UK/US relations.

 This talk is part of the ongoing Economics seminar series, which is dedicated to furthering the exchange of economic ideas in the greater Bard community.


RKC 103 

Tuesday, February 19, 2013

Levy Institute M.S. in Economic Theory and Policy Open House

Levy Institute Master of Science in Economic Theory and Policy will have an Open House at 5:30 pm on Tuesday February 19 in Olin 205 to address questions about the M.S. program. Levy Institute scholars will be available to talk about the Institute's research areas and the M.S. degree.

Pizza will be served.

Levy Institute representatives to attend:

Dimitri B. Papadimitriou (President)
Ajit Zacharias (Senior Scholar, Program Director of Income and Wealth Program)
Thomas Masterson (Research Scholar, Director of Applied Micromodeling)
Taun Toay (Research Analyst)
Liudmila Malyshava (Assistant to the Director, M.S. in Economic Theory and Policy)
Olin, Room 205