• Recent Bard economics alums (Juan Bages, Stergios Mentesidis, Ahnaf Khan and Nicolai Eddy) sharing their experiences with current students at a career advising panel organized by alumni and the Career Development Office at Morningstar, World Trade Center, NYC  Sept 2017
  • Simon Simoski '17 presenting his research on household-debt driven growth.  In the fall, he will join the Masters program at the Levy Institute at Bard.
  • Professors Mike Martell, Ani Mitra and Sanjay DeSilva at the annual picnic - May 2017
  • Prof. Pavlina Tcherneva with students at the annual program picnic - May 2017
  • Prof. Olivier Giovannoni, Nathan Reece and Arielle Weiner-Bronner discussing their research poster at the Bard Summer Research Institute 2014.
  • Eva-Marie Quinones '17 (joint economics and global and international studies major) presenting her research on economic factors that enabled the spread of far-right political parties in Western Europe. She will proceed to the Ph.D. program in political science at Yale this fall.
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Program Events

 

Upcoming Events


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Archive of Past Events

                                        

2018

Wednesday, December 12, 2018

Levy Graduate Programs Online Information Session

All about admissions and enrolling! If you haven’t submitted your application, join us for an informal chat about requirements for admission, financial aid specifics, and other admission topics. 

If you’ve been offered admission, let’s chat about the stages of enrolling in the programs, life on Bard's Annandale campus, Dutchess County (the area in which we’re located), and, of course, the Levy Economics Institute! Webinar 

Friday, November 30, 2018

Levy Graduate Programs Information Session/Webinar

During this information session, Prof. Thomas Masterson will host an informal chat about the academic programs of the M.A. and M.S. in Economic Theory and Policy. We will also answer questions about admission requirements, financial aid, and prerequisites for international students.
 
Your application fee will be waived if you attend. Register HERE

**Please use Google Chrome or Mozilla Firefox on a desktop, laptop, or Android mobile device to participate in the webinar. Other platforms (iPhone, iPad) are not currently supported. Alternatively, join through Facebook LIVE!
Website 

Wednesday, November 28, 2018

Do Patent Rights Matter? 40 Years of Innovation, Complexity and Productivity
 

Cassandra Sweet and Dalibor Eterovic
 
  Does the rigorous protection of patent rights advance or retard economic development? Two decades ago, a new global standard of intellectual property swept across developing and industrialized nations through the implementation of the WTO’s TRIPS Agreement. Many years later, the issue of patents remains contentious. In this talk, we focus on the effects of patent rights systems on total factor productivity growth, using dynamic panel regression analysis for 70 countries from 1965 to 2009. We show that the effects of stronger or more rigorous patent systems are insignificant for productivity growth in both developing and industrialized countries. Why does the strength of patents appear to have no impact on productivity? Classic economic theory suggests that stronger patent systems incentivize innovative output, with important spillover effects for productivity and growth. We offer an alternative explanation using data from the Economic Complexity Index. We find that while patents are increasingly irrelevant to productivity, the relationship between economic complexity and productivity is highly positive and significant. Our results are consistent with the contributions of the absorptive capacity theory in that they suggest it is not the discovery and ownership of novel products and processes at the innovative frontier that induces productive growth, but the ability of countries to adapt, replicate, and diffuse along the international productive chain. Olin, Room 102 

Thursday, November 15, 2018

Special Lecture C. P. Chandrasekhar Professor of Economics Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi Alternative 'models' of structural transformation in Asia and their implications

C. P. Chandrasekhar
Professor of Economics
Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi

C. P. Chandrasekhar is a Professor at the Centre for Economic Studies and Planning, School of Social Sciences, Jawaharlal Nehru University. He has co-authored Crisis as Conquest: Learning from East Asia (2001) and is a regular columnist for Frontline Magazine and Businessline: Financial Daily. His area of expertise is applied macroeconomics and development economics with focus on industry and finance. He was awarded the Malcolm Adiseshaiah Award for 2009, presented to an outstanding social scientist for his or her contribution to economics and development studies. He is a member of the Executive Committee of the International Development Economics Associates (IDEAs), an international network of economists engaged in the promotion of teaching and research using heterodox approaches to economic issues as well as a member of the Executive Committee of the World Economics Association. Blithewood, Levy Institute 

Tuesday, November 13, 2018

The “Global” Labor Market: How Real Is It, and How Should Governments Respond?
 

Aashish Mehta, 
Associate Professor Global Studies, UC Santa Barbara
It is commonly asserted that labor markets are becoming more “global”—or equivalently, that national labor markets are becoming more interconnected. Those making this assertion point out that globalized labor markets have consequences for all sorts of economic policy decisions, ranging from the design of macroeconomic stimulus to education to currency management. But is the assertion meaningful and correct? My collaborators and I argue that labor markets can become interconnected in many different ways, and that each of these dimensions of globalization has a bearing on different policy decisions. We show that some countries’ labor markets have globalized in one dimensions, only to become less global in others—and that the trends along each dimension differ significantly across countries. We also explain why some claims about labor market globalization are currently unverifiable. It follows that governments wishing to clean up policies from a previous era in order to cope with an ostensibly globalized world should approach the task carefully, applying scalpels rather than brooms, especially when considering changes to policies that reduce inequality.

Aashish Mehta is associate professor of global studies at UC Santa Barbara. He is a development economist, with a primary interest in the connections between structural change, globalization, education, employment, and equitable development. He collaborates frequently across disciplinary lines to study the functioning of public institutions in developing countries. Prior to joining UCSB, he served as an economist at the Asian Development Bank.
Olin, Room 102 

Tuesday, November 13, 2018

Levy Graduate Programs Information Session/Webinar

During this information session, Prof. Ajit Zacharias will host an informal chat about the academic programs of the M.A. and M.S. in Economic Theory and Policy. We will also answer questions about admission requirements, financial aid, and prerequisites for international students.
 
Your application fee will be waived if you attend. Register HERE

**Please use Google Chrome or Mozilla Firefox on a desktop, laptop, or Android mobile device to participate in the webinar. Other platforms (iPhone, iPad) are not currently supported. Alternatively, join through Facebook LIVE!
Website 

Wednesday, November 7, 2018

Levy Graduate Programs Information Session/Webinar

During this information session Prof. Michalis Nikiforos will host an informal chat about the academic programs of the MA and MS in Economic Theory and Policy. We will also answer questions about admission requirements, financial aid, and prerequisites for international students.
 
Your application fee will be waived if you attend. Registration is required.

**Please use Google Chrome or Mozilla Firefox on a desktop, laptop, or Android mobile device to participate in the webinar. Other platforms (iPhone, iPad) are not currently supported. Alternatively, join through Facebook LIVE!
Website 

Monday, October 29, 2018

"Life-Affirming Endurance": Decolonial Feminisms in Iran and Beyond

Catherine Z. Sameh
University of California, Irvine
  The anti-colonial thrust of revolutionary and post-revolutionary Iran has been narrated largely through key male theorists and politicians, primarily Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini and Ali Shariati. Decolonial scholarship tends to resurrect this voice through its often uncritical and romanticized engagement with Shariati as the sole anti-colonial voice of Iran. Inviting attention to Iranian women’s rights activists as theorists in their own right, this talk will elaborate an alternative decolonial voice, one characterized by decoloniality’s very commitment to gendered analysis and unrelenting challenge to binary ways of thinking. Olin, Room 102 

Thursday, October 25, 2018

Levy Graduate Programs Information Session/Webinar

During this information session, Jan Kregel, Graduate Programs' director, will host an informal chat about the academic programs of the M.A. and M.S. in Economic Theory and Policy.
We will also answer questions about admission requirements, financial aid and prerequisites for international students.
Your application fee will be waived if you attend.
Registration is required.
**Please use Google Chrome or Mozilla Firefox on a desktop, laptop, or Android mobile device to participate in the webinar. Other platforms (iPhone, iPad) are not currently supported. 
Alternatively, join through Facebook LIVE!
Website 

Wednesday, October 17, 2018

Levy Graduate Programs Information Session/Webinar

Hosted by Prof. Thomas Masterson During this information session Prof. Masterson will host an informal chat about his research. He will also talk about  the academic programs and curricula of the MA and MS in Economic Theory and Policy. Prepare any questions you have about admission requirements, financial aid, and prerequisites for international students. Website 

Tuesday, October 2, 2018

Socioeconomic Integration of U.S. Immigrant Groups over the Long Term: The Second Generation and Beyond.

Stephen J. Trejo, Department of Economics, University of Texas at Austin We document generational patterns of educational attainment and earnings for contemporary immigrant groups. We also discuss some potentially serious measurement issues that arise when attempting to track the socioeconomic progress of the later-generation descendants of U.S. immigrants, and we summarize what recent research has to say about these measurement issues and how they might bias our assessment of the long-term integration of particular groups. Most national origin groups arrive with relatively high educational attainment and/or experience enough improvement between the first and second generations such that they quickly meet or exceed, on average, the schooling level of the typical American. Several large and important Hispanic groups (including Mexicans and Puerto Ricans) are exceptions to this pattern, however, and their prospects for future upward mobility are subject to much debate. Because of measurement issues and data limitations, Mexican Americans in particular and Hispanic Americans in general probably have experienced significantly more socioeconomic progress beyond the second generation than available data indicate. Even so, it may take longer for their descendants to integrate fully into the American mainstream than it did for the descendants of the European immigrants who arrived near the turn of the twentieth century. Olin, Room 102 

Sunday, June 17, 2018 – Saturday, June 23, 2018

The Hyman P. Minsky Summer Seminar

The Levy Economics Institute of Bard College is pleased to announce the ninth Minsky Summer Seminar will be held from June 17–23, 2018. The Seminar will provide a rigorous discussion of both the theoretical and applied aspects of Minsky’s economics, with an examination of meaningful prescriptive policies relevant to the current economic and financial outlook. It will also provide an introduction to Wynne Godley’s stock-flow consistent modeling methods via hands-on workshops. Blithewood, Levy Institute 

Thursday, May 3, 2018

Do Workfare Programs Promote Climate Resilience and Food Security? Evidence from Indian Agriculture

Vis Taraz, Assistant Professor of Economics, Smith College
India’s National Rural Employment Guarantee Act (NREGA), the world’s largest public works program, has been demonstrated to have beneficial impacts on a wide range of outcomes, but its effects on agricultural productivity have been relatively understudied (Sukhtankar 2016a). We test whether NREGA affects agricultural yields, both in terms of average yields and also in terms of the sensitivity of yields to weather shocks. Our empirical strategy exploits the staggered rollout of NREGA and random fluctuations in weather. Using a nationwide dataset, we find that NREGA does not affect the average level of yields, but it does make yields more sensitive to adverse weather shocks. We find evidence that this may be occurring via the channels of wages and labor supply, because the effects we observe are most pronounced for crops that are more labor intensive. Our results suggest that the household-level consumption-smoothing benefits of NREGA must be balanced against challenges to national food security that India faces, particularly in the face of climate change. Hence, implementing complementary programs such as investing in improved seed varieties, expanding extension services, and promoting farm mechanization is critical.
Campus Center 2nd floor Yellow Room 

Tuesday, April 17, 2018 – Wednesday, April 18, 2018

27th Annual Hyman P. Minsky Conference

Financial Stability in a World of Rising Rates and the Repeal of Dodd-Frank Blithewood, Levy Institute 

Friday, April 6, 2018

Capitalist Pasts, Post-Capitalist Futures 

Inaugural Conference, History of Capitalism at Bard  Speakers include:
Kevin Duong (Bard)
David Kettler (Bard)
Zak Rawle (Bard)
Jane Glaubman (Cornell)
Joseph Sheehan (Bard)
Simon deBevoise (Bard)
Zeke Perkins (SEIU)
Ed Quish (Cornell)
Maggie Dickinson (CUNY)
Joy Al-Nemri (Bard)
Ella McLeod (Bard)
Laura Ford (Bard)
Holger Droessler (Bard)
  Reem-Kayden Center Laszlo Z. Bito '60 Auditorium 

Thursday, March 1, 2018

Job Displacement, Family Dynamics, and Spousal Labor Supply

Andrea Weber
CEU-Bard Advanced Certificate Program in Inequality Analysis
We study interdependencies in spousal labor supply and provide new empirical evidence on the added worker effect, the change in labor supply in response to an income shock to the spouse. Our focus is married couples in which the husband loses his job due to a mass layoff or plant closure, using data from the Austrian Social Security Database. Couples in our sample are relatively young and the shock hits households at crucial stages of family formation. The high volatility in wives' predisplacement labor market careers requires a careful choice of a control group to model the counterfactual outcome at the household level. We examine three quasi-experimental counterfactual scenarios that are potentially affected by different types of selection on unobservables. Our analysis shows that husbands' and wives' labor market responses are remarkably consistent across all three scenarios and leads to four main conclusions. First, while husbands suffer large and persistent employment and earnings losses over the first five years after displacement, wives' labor supply increases only moderately, but persistently. Second, wives respond predominantly at the extensive margin. The implied participation elasticity with respect to the husband's earnings shock is very small, about 0.05 in the full sample and 0.08 in the sample of wives not employed at displacement. Third, in terms of nonlabor market-related outcomes we find a small positive effect on the probability of divorce but no effect of the husband's job displacement on fertility. Fourth, the effect of wives' labor supply responses on household income is negligible compared to the effects of unemployment insurance, which dampens especially the large initial earnings shock from job displacement. A plausible explanation for the very limited spousal labor response is gender identity norms, which prevent mothers of young children to enter the labor force.
Campus Center Yellow Room